Romanesque Revival Architecture Wikipedia

Romanesque Revival architecture - Wikipedia.

Romanesque Revival (or Neo-Romanesque) is a style of building employed beginning in the mid-19th century inspired by the 11th- and 12th-century Romanesque architecture.Unlike the historic Romanesque style, Romanesque Revival buildings tended to feature more simplified arches and windows than their historic counterparts..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanesque_Revival_architecture.

Romanesque architecture - Wikipedia.

Romanesque architecture is an architectural style of medieval Europe characterized by semi-circular arches. There is no consensus for the beginning date of the Romanesque style, with proposals ranging from the 6th to the 11th century, this later date being the most commonly held. ... Romanesque Revival architecture; Natural History Museum ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanesque_architecture.

Italianate architecture - Wikipedia.

United States East Coast. The Italianate style was popularized in the United States by Alexander Jackson Davis in the 1840s as an alternative to Gothic or Greek Revival styles. Davis' design for Blandwood is the oldest surviving example of Italianate architecture in the United States, constructed in 1844 as the residence of North Carolina Governor John Motley Morehead..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italianate_architecture.

Pre-Romanesque art and architecture - Wikipedia.

Pre-Romanesque art and architecture is the period in European art from either the emergence of the Merovingian kingdom in about 500 AD or from the Carolingian Renaissance in the late 8th century, to the beginning of the 11th century Romanesque period. The term is generally used in English only for architecture and monumental sculpture, but here all the arts of the period are ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-Romanesque_art_and_architecture.

Colonial Revival architecture - Wikipedia.

The Colonial Revival architectural style seeks to revive elements of American colonial architecture.. The beginnings of the Colonial Revival style are often attributed to the Centennial Exhibition of 1876, which reawakened Americans to the architectural traditions of their colonial past. Fairly small numbers of Colonial Revival homes were built c. 1880-1910, a period when ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonial_Revival_architecture.

Islamic architecture - Wikipedia.

The architecture of the "oriental"-Islamic town is based on cultural and sociological concepts which differ from those of European cities. In both cultures, a distinction is made between the areas used by the rulers and their government and administration, public places of everyday common life, and the areas of private life..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islamic_architecture.

History of architecture - Wikipedia.

The history of architecture traces the changes in architecture through various traditions, regions, overarching stylistic trends, and dates. The beginnings of all these traditions is thought to be humans satisfying the very basic need of shelter and protection. The term "architecture" generally refers to buildings, but in its essence is much broader, including fields we now consider ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_architecture.

French architecture - Wikipedia.

The Early Gothic style began in 1140 and was characterized by the adoption of the pointed arch and transition from late Romanesque architecture. ... It would take until Laboustre's Neo-Grec of the second Empire for the Greek revival to flower briefly in France. Former Government House in Cayenne, French Guiana, begun 1729. Early French Colonial ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_architecture.

America's Favorite Architecture - Wikipedia.

"America's Favorite Architecture" is a list of buildings and other structures identified as the most popular works of architecture in the United ... Gothic Revival: 4: Jefferson Memorial: Washington: DC: John Russell Pope: 1939-43: Neoclassical: 5: Golden Gate Bridge ... Richardsonian Romanesque: 36: Old Faithful Inn: Yellowstone National ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/America%27s_Favorite_Architecture.

Ancient Greek architecture - Wikipedia.

Ancient Greek architecture came from the Greek-speaking people (Hellenic people) whose culture flourished on the Greek mainland, the Peloponnese, the Aegean Islands, and in colonies in Anatolia and Italy for a period from about 900 BC until the 1st century AD, with the earliest remaining architectural works dating from around 600 BC.. Ancient Greek architecture is best ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek_architecture.

Style néo-roman — Wikipédia.

Le style neo-roman etait un style en vogue a la fin du XIX e siecle inspire par le style architectural roman des XI e et XII e siecles. Les caracteristiques distinctives les plus couramment employees dans les batiments neo-romans etaient les voutes en berceau, les fenetres en arc plein cintre et les bandeaux. A la difference du style roman classique, cet << eclectisme >> roman ....

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Style_n%C3%A9o-roman.

Vernacular architecture - Wikipedia.

Vernacular architecture is building done outside any academic tradition, and without professional guidance. This category encompasses a wide range and variety of building types, with differing methods of construction, from around the world, both historical and extant, representing the majority of buildings and settlements created in pre-industrial societies..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernacular_architecture.

Georgian architecture - Wikipedia.

Georgian architecture is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1714 and 1830. It is named after the first four British monarchs of the House of Hanover--George I, George II, George III, and George IV--who reigned in continuous succession from August 1714 to June 1830. The so-called great Georgian cities of ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgian_architecture.

Carpenter Gothic - Wikipedia.

Carpenter Gothic, also sometimes called Carpenter's Gothic or Rural Gothic, is a North American architectural style-designation for an application of Gothic Revival architectural detailing and picturesque massing applied to wooden structures built by house-carpenters. The abundance of North American timber and the carpenter-built vernacular architectures based upon it made a ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carpenter_Gothic.

French Gothic architecture - Wikipedia.

French Gothic architecture is an architectural style which emerged in France in 1140, and was dominant until the mid-16th century. The most notable examples are the great Gothic cathedrals of France, including Notre-Dame Cathedral, Reims Cathedral, Chartres Cathedral, and Amiens Cathedral.Its main characteristics were the search for verticality, or height, and the innovative ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Gothic_architecture.

Postmodern architecture - Wikipedia.

Postmodern architecture is a style or movement which emerged in the 1960s as a reaction against the austerity, formality, and lack of variety of modern architecture, particularly in the international style advocated by Philip Johnson and Henry-Russell Hitchcock.The movement was introduced by the architect and urban planner Denise Scott Brown and architectural theorist ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postmodern_architecture.

Medieval architecture - Wikipedia.

Medieval architecture is architecture common in the Middle Ages, and includes religious, civil, and military buildings.Styles include pre-Romanesque, Romanesque, and Gothic.While most of the surviving medieval architecture is to be seen in churches and castles, examples of civic and domestic architecture can be found throughout Europe, in manor houses, town halls, ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_architecture.

Architecture of Paris - Wikipedia.

The city of Paris has notable examples of architecture of every period, from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. It was the birthplace of the Gothic style, and has important monuments of the French Renaissance, Classical revival, the Flamboyant style of the reign of Napoleon III, the Belle Epoque, and the Art Nouveau style. The great Exposition Universelle (1889) and 1900 added ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architecture_of_Paris.

Architecture of cathedrals and great churches - Wikipedia.

The architecture of cathedrals and great churches is characterised by the buildings' large scale and follows one of several branching traditions of form, function and style that derive ultimately from the Early Christian architectural traditions established in Late Antiquity during the Christianization of the Roman Empire.. Cathedrals, collegiate churches, and monastic churches ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architecture_of_cathedrals_and_great_churches.

Cape Cod (house) - Wikipedia.

A Cape Cod house is a low, broad, single or double-story frame building with a moderately-steep-pitched gabled roof, a large central chimney, and very little ornamentation.Originating in New England in the 17th century, the simple symmetrical design was constructed of local materials to withstand the stormy weather of Cape Cod.It features a central front door flanked by ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Cod_(house).